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Friday, October 24, 2014

What's Next by Liz Flaherty



FEARLESS FRIDAY
Please join me in welcoming author Liz Flaherty with a fun tale!
The silence is eerie in its completeness. I don’t know where the panic-induced adrenalin has gone, because it was noisy in and of itself, but it’s curiously absent. I’m calm and unafraid. Well, not calm—we’re 600 feet in the air, for God’s sake, dangling precariously from a harness without a seat. There’s air buffeting us around a bit. It feels…nice. Scary. No, just nice. I never think of exhilaration as being silent but it is right now—silent and joyous. Is this what dying is like? I wonder.
“Okay,” says Lynn, my sister-in-law and partner in crime—for whom height is an issue, “that’s enough. We can go down now.”
I wrote that over two years ago. I was 62, Lynn was 59, she has a heights issue, and I’m terrified of water. These all seemed like viable reasons to go parasailing. So we did.
I was fairly new to being retired and terrified of what I was about to become. Retired people didn’t work anymore, did they? They watched television, complained about their health, and drove too slow in the left lane, right? They used the term “fixed income” as though it was confined to them. They got percentages off at stores and restaurants, but never got their wallets out until the cashier told them how much they owed. They went through the 15-items-or-less checkout with a full cart because, as one man told me while I stood behind his week’s worth of groceries with my bread and milk, “You can wait. I’ve worked all my life. I’ve earned this.”
That day, not the one when Lynn and I were strapped into harnesses and lifted high in the air, was the life-changer. It was the one that made me decide what kind of old person I intended to be.
I would be the one who counted her items before she used the express line, the one who drove at least the speed limit and stayed in the right lane unless I was passing someone. I would only watch TV if there was absolutely nothing better to do and my answer to “how are you feeling?” was always going to be short and positive. I’d take my senior discounts, but I’d have my wallet out and waiting when I heard the total owed. I was going to keep working, keep writing until they withdrew my keyboard from my cold, dead hands.
It’s not always as easy to do as it is to type the words here—even I will admit that—but it’s not always that hard, either. I can’t write as fast as I used to, but I’ve had four books traditionally published since I retired. I’m not sure how I’d do with eight hours a day on my feet anymore, but I log a lot of volunteer hours and have a really good time doing it. I don’t have any trouble keeping up with traffic, staying on the right side of the road, or knowing which checkout lanes I should use.
Even though parasailing is the rashest thing I’ve done in this new invention of myself, the rude old man’s remark was the life-changer for me. I’m really glad for both experiences.
I still want to go zip-lining. Or maybe make a tandem jump from an airplane. I want to go back to Europe. I’ve learned there are two great words that go along with being retired.
What’s next?

Bio
Liz retired from the post office and promised to spend at least fifteen minutes a day on housework. Not wanting to overdo things, she’s since pared that down to ten. She spends non-writing time sewing, quilting, and doing whatever else she wants to. She and Duane, her husband of…oh, quite a while, are the parents of three and grandparents of the Magnificent Seven. They live in the old farmhouse in Indiana they moved to in 1977. They’ve talked about moving, but really…37 years’ worth of stuff? It’s not happening!
She’d love to hear from you at lizkflaherty@gmail.com.


Back to McGuffey’s
ISBN: 978-0-373-36696-5 
The one that got away 
Could Kate Rafael’s day get any worse? First she lost her job, then her house burned down and now her ex is back in town. Apparently, Ben McGuffey's taking a break from being a big-city doctor to help at his family’s tavern and reassess the choices he's made for his career.
Ben ends up giving Kate a hand...then giving her kisses...and finally, a second chance. But when a local teenager shows them both a glimpse of what it means to be a family, Ben wonders if having kids in small-town Vermont would clash with his ambitions. Or can he truly come home again…to Kate?

Buy Link

16 comments:

  1. Thanks for having me today, Brenda!

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  2. RadioMan and I are planning to parasail when we go on our next cruise...I'm excited and nervous and maybe a little bit scared. I love your attitude, Liz, great post!

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  3. What a great post--not to mention a positive attitude! The grocery line man made me grit my teeth just reading about it. The other day there was a woman like that ahead of me and about 4 other people. The clerk said, "I don't care. I'm not in a rush." I said in a tone that shouted don't mess with me, "Some of us are." The others in the line clapped! I applaud your awesome view on life!

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    1. Honesty compels me to admit I did it once--I didn't see the sign proclaiming the checkout to be express--and took a FULL CART through. Not until someone behind me made a remark did I look up. I was half-done so couldn't stop, but I must have apologized profusely enough because we were all friends by the time I was done. I felt so stupid!

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  4. Huh. I think the internet ate my comment. I'll try again. Love your attitude and being a little older than you, I totally agree with all you've said. I found it amusing that I published four books in the same year that I applied for Medicare. I'm confident I'll know when to quit. Ha ha.

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    1. I'm not sure if I'll know, and I admit that worries me some. Good for you for publishing four that year! I'm up for Medicare in August--maybe I'll have a good year, too! Thanks for coming by, Roben.

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  5. Another Golden Oldie here - I've also published since retiring and have no plans to quit soon, either. I have a thing about heights, actually about falling from heights, too, and loved parasailing. And hot ballooning. And zip lining. Sometimes you just have to let your fears know they aren't in control. :>0

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    1. Absolutely! I'm a little leery of ballooning--maybe I better get over that. :-)

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  6. You're officially my idol. After eighteen months, I'm still figuring out exactly how to be retired. My writing has suffered, but my days seem fuller than ever! I have every intention of picking up the pace, but no para-sailing for me (too much of a chicken).

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    1. It took me a while, not to learn how to be retired so much as to share the house with my also-retired other half. That was a challenge--at which we succeeded--but for me (and I think for Duane, too) that was the hard part. Days are definitely full, but it's so much fun! Thanks for coming by, Alison!

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  7. I like "what's next?" I'm not retired yet, but Husband is. Is there a way I can convince him to ask that question more frequently? He's settling into a retired life just a hair too comfortably! ;-)

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    1. LOL. No, because when he says, "What's next?" you have to think something up for him.

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  8. What a fabulous post! I'm not officially retired by government standards but I quit working after my second child. I have no desire or plans to go back to work and therefore consider myself retired. My grandmother lives the life you are setting out to do, although she's slowed down now at 94. Keep asking, "What's next?" and maybe I'll see you on a zip-line some day.

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    1. I'll watch for you! I loved working, I really did, and I love NOT working, so it was the best of both worlds for me.

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